Volume 1, Issue 2 (12-2015)                   Iran J Neurosurg 2015, 1(2): 27-30 | Back to browse issues page


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Farajirad E, Ghaemi K, Khajavi M, Hamidi Alamdari D, Hassan Arjmand M, Farajirad M. Comparison of Prooxidant-antioxidant Balance between Patients with High Grade Gliomas (IV) and Control Group. Iran J Neurosurg. 2015; 1 (2) :27-30
URL: http://irjns.org/article-1-12-en.html
Abstract:   (1522 Views)

Background & Aim: The most common primary brain tumors of the central nervous system are gliomas. Among a number of different biomolecular events, a strong relation between oxidative stress pathways and the development of this cancer has been proved. Oxidative stress (OS) is the consequence of an imbalance between pro-oxidants and antioxidants towards pro-oxidants. The pro-oxidants cause lipid peroxidation of cell membranes, protein, DNA oxidation and changes in brain cell growth. In this study, the pro-oxidant–antioxidant balance (PAB) was determined in patients with gliomas. Methods & Materials/Patients: Sera of 49 patients with high grade glioma (grade IV WHO) which is called glioblastoma multiform (GBM) and 49 healthy subjects were collected and PAB test was measured. Results: A significant increase of PAB value was observed in patients with GBM (158.10±85.71 HK unit) in comparison to control group (74.54±33.54 HK). Conclusion: The PAB assay showed the oxidative stress in glioblastoma. In further research, this easy elucidation of oxidative stress in these patients can be applied to evaluate the effectiveness of antioxidant therapies in patients with GBM.Keywords: Prooxidant-antioxidant; Balance; High

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Type of Study: Research | Subject: Gamma Knife Radiosurgery
* Corresponding Author Address: * Corresponding Author Address: Professor of Neurosurgery, Head of Neurosurgery Department, Faculty of medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran. Tel +985138424834, Fax:+9838425878 Email: Farajim@mums.ac.ir

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